Latest Brett Kavanaugh headlines

WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh speaks at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. A professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland. (Photo By Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images)

JOAN VENNOCHI

With ‘Impeach Kavanaugh,’ Democrats find another way to lose

An overreaction by Democratic presidential candidates could help Donald Trump.

Ana Maria Archila confronted then-Senator Jeff Flake about Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in a US Capitol elevator in October.

What She Said

Activist who confronted Jeff Flake offers rebuke to ‘witch hunt’ claim

Ana Maria Archila, who briefly grabbed the national spotlight during Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s Senate confirmation hearings, was honored for her activism.

FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2011, file photo, then-Rep. Mary Bono, R-Calif., listens at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington. Former California Congresswoman Bono announced her resignation Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018, as the interim president at USA Gymnastics after just four days on the job. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

COMMENTARy | Jeneé Osterheldt

White feminism isn’t feminism. And it’s not forgivable

From Teresa Klein to Mary Bono to Bette Midler, empty apologies and shallow allies aren’t forgivable.

SCOT LEHIGH

We need higher political standards for men

Why the double standard for what’s politically acceptable?

WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 05: A police officer stands guard in front of the U.S. Supreme Court October 5, 2018 in Washington, DC. The Senate voted 51-49 in a procedural vote to advance the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Editorial

Reform the Supreme Court, and start with term limits

America needs a tempered, respected Supreme Court now more than ever.

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, talks to a crowd a journalists after speaking on the Senate floor in favor of Brett Kavanaugh on Friday, Oct. 5. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Melina Mara

SCOT LEHIGH

Susan Collins’s political identity crisis

Susan Collins’s carefully cultivated image of independent-minded moderate is in tatters.

Brett Kavanaugh testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee in late September.

Brookline friend of Deborah Ramirez says claim against Kavanaugh wasn’t fully investigated

Jennifer Klaus, who lives in Brookline, is a friend of the woman who alleged Brett Kavanaugh exposed his genitals a Yale party.

Senator Susan Collins, Republican of Maine, on Christine Blasey Ford: “I believed that a sexual assault had happened to her. What I think she is mistaken about is who the perpetrator was.”

Susan Collins says she thinks Brett Kavanaugh’s accuser was ‘mistaken’

“I do not believe her assailant was Brett Kavanaugh,” the Maine senator said during an interview with “60 Minutes” that aired on Sunday night.

Supreme court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool)

It must be tough to be named Brett Kavanaugh right now — this tweet thread proves it

A number of people — from the world’s Mike Pences to Siris to Susan Collinses and Michael Cohens — who bear the same name as prominent figures are vocalizing their woes.

Democrat Senator Joe Manchin speaks about his recent vote in the Senate to confirm Brett Kavanaugh, Sunday, Oct. 7, 2018 at IHOP Charleston W.Va. A day after Manchin broke with his party on what may be the most consequential vote of the young Trump era, the West Virginia Democrat faces a political firestorm back home.(AP Photo/Tyler Evert)

Democrat Joe Manchin faces firestorm at home after voting for Kavanaugh

The West Virginia senator was the only Democrat to support Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee.

Editorial

Senators have voted on Kavanaugh. Now it’s your turn.

Officially, the fight over Kavanaugh’s nomination over. In reality, the ugliness of the last two weeks will be litigated again in the midterms.

‘SNL’ doesn’t mince words when it comes to Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation

The show also addressed the unplanned speech Kanye West gave on last weekend’s “SNL” episode, in which the rapper professed his support for President Trump.

WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 05: U.S. Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) speaks to reporters after a floor speech to announce that she will vote for the nomination of Supreme Court Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court, at the U.S. Capitol, October 5, 2018 in Washington, DC. The Senate voted 51-49 in a procedural vote to advance the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Moderates pave way for Kavanaugh’s confirmation

Susan Collins, a Republican senator from Maine, announced she will vote for Brett Kavanaugh, making it a near certainty that he will win a Supreme Court seat in Saturday’s vote.

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, meets with Supreme Court nominee Bret Kavanaugh in Washington, D.C., on Aug. 21, 2018. MUST CREDIT: Bloomberg photo by Andrew Harrer

editorial

Susan Collins goes all in for Kavanaugh — and for Trump

In voting yes, Collins and her fellow Senate Republicans are on the brink of dealing a far-reaching setback to the Supreme Court’s standing in American life.

Detained protesters gesture at the Senate Hart building during a rally against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on October 4, 2018. - Top Republicans voiced confidence Thursday that Brett Kavanaugh will be confirmed to the US Supreme Court this weekend, as they asserted that an FBI probe had found nothing to support sex assault allegations against Donald Trump's nominee.

Indira A.R. Lakshmanan

One year in, #MeToo hasn’t brought the change we need

The fight over Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh — and his defense by a president himself accused of misconduct — has turned into a referendum on a long-overdue cultural reckoning.

WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 04: President Donald Trump arrives back at the White House, after a rally in Minneapolis, MN on October 4, 2018. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis-Pool/Getty Images)

SCOT LEHIGH

The Great Trumpkin hears troubling voices

With his huge lie exposed, can The Great Trumpkin still fool all the Little Trumpkins all the time?

Mark Judge outside a friend's home in Bethany Beach, Del.

Thanks to the Boston Public Library, you can read Mark Judge’s book ‘Wasted’ online

The library shared the book with the Internet Archive this week so it could be viewed by the public.

Judge Brett Kavanaugh testified last week before the Senate Judiciary Committee

Commentary

Jeff Flake, Donald Trump, and the ‘leeway’ for men’s bad behavior

With rape culture, you either recognize it’s real and fight it, or you don’t.

Brett Kavanaugh turns in a disqualifying performance

Opinion | Nancy Gertner

Brett Kavanaugh turns in a disqualifying performance

A judge is supposed to offer an appearance of impartiality, avoiding remarks or situations that might lead reasonable people to believe he is partisan.

Brett Kavanaugh testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee last week.

Michael A. Cohen

Republicans obviously don’t believe Kavanaugh

The GOP’s actions aren’t those of a party that thinks its high-court nominee has no skeletions.

If US Senator Susan Collins votes to confirm Brett Kavanaugh, she not only undercuts her reputation as a supporter of abortion rights, but she also risks a significant challenge from Democrats in 2020.

Ground Game

On Brett Kavanaugh, Susan Collins can’t win

The Maine Republican is under tremendous pressure from the left and the right as she publicly contemplates whether to confirm Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.

Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s hostility last week was more than just a hammy performance for a president who cheers cartoonish bluster as manly strength. It was the angry cry of a man who has been taught from birth that every tomorrow belongs to him.

Renée Graham

Brett Kavanaugh’s superiority complex

In America, a privileged white man makes the rules; he doesn’t adhere to them.

SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE --

Jimmy Kimmel mocks Matt Damon for ‘Saturday Night Live’ cameo as Brett Kavanaugh

“What a surprise that Matt Damon would have no other plans on a Saturday,” Kimmel said on Monday’s episode of “Jimmy Kimmel Live!”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell spoke Tuesday on Capitol Hill.

Lawyers for Kavanaugh accusers question FBI investigation

Lawyers for two women who accuse Brett Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct say they fear the FBI is not conducting a thorough investigation. The bureau is expected to deliver its report as early as Wednesday, and GOP leaders said they expect to vote on Kavanaugh’s nomination this week.

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Here’s what we know about the FBI investigation into Brett Kavanaugh

What is the status of the investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct Kavanaugh during his high school and college years?

Harvard Law School says Brett Kavanaugh’s course is canceled

The high court nominee had been scheduled to teach a course in January titled “The Supreme Court since 2005.”

Brett Kavanaugh testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday.

Harvard Law School says Brett Kavanaugh’s course is canceled

The high court nominee had been scheduled to teach a course in January titled “The Supreme Court since 2005.”

Senator Jeff Flake was introduced Monday at the Under 30 Summit held on City Hall Plaza.

SCOT LEHIGH

Senator Jeff Flake’s next stop: New Hampshire?

Is Flake a rising star or a falling one?

Senator Jeff Flake spoke at an appearance in Boston on Monday.

FBI should conduct ‘real investigation’ into Kavanaugh, Flake says in Boston

Speaking during the Forbes Under 30 Summit, Senator Jeff Flake said “any current, credible allegation that has been made” should be “fully investigated.”

10/1/18-Congressional Candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York speaks at rally outside City Hall. Jessica Rinaldi/ Globe Staff. Boston Globe cell phone

City Hall Plaza protest calls on Senator Flake to reject Kavanaugh for Supreme Court

Demonstrators rallied at City Hall Plaza in Boston Monday to demand that Senators reject Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanuagh’s bid for a seat on the nation’s highest court.

Harvard undergraduate panel asks university officials to look into Kavanaugh sex assault allegations

The Harvard Undergraduate Council wants an investigation before Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is permitted to return to campus to teach.

Quincy, MA - 9/15/2018 - Senator Elizabeth Warren addresses the crowd during a town hall meeting at Quincy High School on Saturday, September 15, 2018. (Michael Swensen for The Boston Globe) Topic: (metro)

For Warren, ‘engaged and enraged’ Democratic women strong base for potential presidential run

But if the senator moves ahead with a presidential campaign, a successful run will mean attracting independents and voters who cast ballots for Trump in 2016, observers said.

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday.

Editorial

The country won’t know the truth about Brett Kavanaugh unless the FBI investigation is a real one

The FBI has the best tools to determine whether Christine Blasey Ford or Brett Kavanaugh is telling the truth. Will the FBI be allowed to use them?

Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 27, 2018.

Opinion | Richard North Patterson

The telling role of character in the Ford-Kavanaugh controversy

Like a Greek tragedy, the controversy over Brett Kavanaugh comes down to character.

Matt Damon really looked like Brett Kavanaugh on ‘Saturday Night Live’

Damon’s appearance was the on-screen highlight of the show’s season opener.

President Trump arrived on stage for a rally at WesBanco Arena in Wheeling, W. Va., on Saturday.

Trump urges supporters to vote in wake of Brett Kavanaugh hearing

The president told supporters in West Virginia that voting can help reject the ‘‘ruthless and outrageous tactics’’ he says Democrats used against Judge Brett Kavanaugh.

FBI contacts Yale classmate who accused Brett Kavanaugh of misconduct

The FBI has contacted Deborah Ramirez, who’s accused Brett Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct when he was a Yale student, as part of the bureau’s investigation of the Supreme Court nominee.

Fact check: The Kavanaugh nomination and the world beyond

A review of the week’s rhetoric and the facts behind it on multiple fronts.

Brett Kavanaugh testified to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday.

Analysis

Brett Kavanaugh’s defiance brings echoes of Trump-style combat

Grudges, grievances, and score-settling animated Kavanaugh’s defense against sexual assault allegations.

Harvard Law School

Harvard Law students protest any return of lecturer Brett Kavanaugh to Cambridge

The dean of the law school, John Manning, refused to comment on Kavanaugh’s status at Harvard, where he has taught since 2008 and is slated to return in January.

WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Christine Blasey Ford swears in at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. A professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland. (Photo by Melina Mara-Pool/Getty Images)

Alan Dershowitz and Eric MacLeish

Did we get to the truth in the Kavanaugh hearings?

With an FBI investigation underway, following a nine-hour Senate hearing on Thursday, two high-profile lawyers weigh in on whether Christine Blasey Ford or Brett Kavanaugh was lying.

Christine Blasey Ford said her attackers'

It’s a Thing

From seal slaps to manspreading solutions

A review of the week online.

SEPTEMBER 27, 2018 - WASHINGTON, DC: Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh testified in front of the Senate Judiciary committee regarding sexual assault allegations at the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill Thursday, September 27, 2018. (Photo by Gabriella Demczuk-Pool/Getty Images)

Editorial

The lies that senators must tell themselves to support Brett Kavanaugh

The issue here is as much Brett Kavanaugh’s honesty in the present as what he may have done in 1982.

Sen. Jeff Flake, R- Ariz., is questioned by reporters about Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, Friday Sept. 28, 2018, on Capitol Hill in Washington. After a flurry of last-minute negotiations, the Senate Judiciary Committee advanced Brett Kavanaugh's nomination for the Supreme Court after agreeing to a late call from Sen. Flake for a one week investigation into sexual assault allegation against the high court nominee. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

SCOT LEHIGH

With call for FBI probe, Jeff Flake steps into the breach

The pity is that it took one man with a conscience to force the majority to do its duty.

Dr. Christine Blasey Ford is sworn in by chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, on September 27, 2018, during the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, focusing on allegations of sexual assault by Kavanaugh against Christine Blasey Ford in the early 1980s. (Photo by Tom Williams / POOL / AFP)TOM WILLIAMS/AFP/Getty Images

Opinion | KathRYN Miles

I was prepared for the Kavanaugh hearing to bring back memories of my sexual assault. I wasn’t prepared for the committee’s response

I wasn’t prepared for the sense of rejection I would feel watching my government decide that the accusations of three women was not reason enough to stop advancing Kavanaugh’s nomination.

WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 28: Sen. Jeff Flake (C) (R-AZ) speaks during a meeting of the Senate Judiciary Committee September 28, 2018 in Washington, DC. Flake was crucial in getting the committee to agree to an additional week of investigations into accusations of sexual assault against Kavanaugh before the full Senate votes.

JOAN VENNOCHI

Jeff Flake gives a little cover to fellow Republicans

An FBI investigation gives the Senate an opportunity to hit the pause button.

Supreme Court nomiinee Brett Kavanaugh at his Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Washington on Sept. 4, 2018. MUST CREDIT: Bloomberg photo by Andrew Harrer.

Opinion | Mickey Edwards

The real danger Brett Kavanaugh poses

Kavanaugh’s view that a president who commits a crime cannot be indicted has no basis in the Constitution.

Activist march as they demonstrate against US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in Washington, DC, on September 28, 2018. - The Senate Judiciary Committee on Friday approved Kavanaugh, Donald Trump's pick for the US Supreme Court, one day after he fought off allegations of sexual assault at an emotional day-long public hearing. But in a dramatic last-minute move, Republican Senator Jeff Flake of Arizona asked for a delay of up to a week before the full vote takes place to allow for an FBI investigation into the allegations against Kavanaugh. (Photo by Eric BARADAT / AFP)ERIC BARADAT/AFP/Getty Images

Opinion | Rebecca G. Pontikes

What Kavanaugh’s testimony tells us about the kind of justice he would be

A litigator focused on employment discrimination offers analysis of Brett Kavanaugh’s testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Senator Jeff Flake.

Jeff Flake’s planned talk in Boston moved amid safety concerns

The Arizona Republican is scheduled to talk at Forbes’s Under 30 Summit on Monday.

Christine Blasey Ford listens to opening statements before testifying to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. (Saul Loeb/Pool Photo via AP)

SCOT LEHIGH

Christine Blasey Ford was more credible

Absent an FBI investigation of sexual misconduct allegations, Brett Kavanaugh shouldn’t be on the court.